A Libertarian View: War of the Words






If a Martian came to earth and watched what the state does when it “regulates,” she might scientifically report that the government just mugged a guy who was minding his own business. Alas, the progressive state lies with words to cover up its crimes.






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Mascia, Schroeder balk at BMHA mismanagement






    BY TERRENCE ROBINSON In this chapter of the Mascia Chronicles we will take the reader on a hair-raising

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Enter a Divine Land






Shen Yun, the world touring Chinese Performing Arts Company will be returning to Shea’s this weekend. The talented company presents a story-based performance of Chinese classical dance combined with ethnic dance, folk dance and featured solo performers. A western philharmonic orchestra that interestingly integrates traditional Chinese instruments accompanies the dancers. 






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Bach to the Future






The young and innovative musicians of the Buffalo Bach Project will make their Friends of Vienna debut this Sunday at 3:30pm in the Unity Church, 1243 Delaware Avenue, in the final concert of the FOV’s current season. Soprano Maria Lindsey, oboist and French horn player Megan Kyle, cellist Katie Weissman and harpsichordist and pianist Garrett Martin, will present arias from six different Bach cantatas, interspersed with several intriguing modern compositions, as the group’s spokeswoman, Megan Kyle, explains.






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Jon Lehrer Talks Yeats






This weekend, the Irish Classical Theatre Company’s will open The Yeats Project: Two Plays by W.B. Yeats, a three-way collaboration with Lehrer Dance and Torn Space Theater. The production offers a relatively rare opportunity to take in two plays by William Butler Yeats: The Land of Heart’s Desire, the first of his plays to be performed publicly; and At the Hawk’s Well, one of his “Four Plays for Dancers.” Both plays reflect Yeats’ fascination with Irish mythology, and are remembered for their association with the Irish Literary Revival undertaken by Yeats, Lady Gregory, and others.  






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Daniel Bassin’s UB Farewell






The UB Symphony Orchestra will end its season with a free performance this Sunday April 24, at 3pm in Slee Concert Hall, under the baton, for the final time, of its Music Director, Daniel Bassin. Sunday’s concert will feature the kind of refreshing and innovative programming that Dan has established as his hallmark.  Roland Martin’s new orchestration of George Butterworth’s Six Songs from “A Shropshire Lad”, after poems by A.E. Housman, will be sung by Robert Gerst, winner of the UBSO Concerto Competition.






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Activist Amber Small Running Hard for Democratic Nod in 60th District






Community activist Amber Small, a relative political newcomer, is running an aggressive grassroots-oriented campaign in her bid to win the kind of support that will help her land the Democratic Party endorsement for the 60th District State Senate seat being vacated by Marc Panepinto who announced last month he won’t seek re-election amid hints of a staff scandal.






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Trumping the Left






What better topic to introduce my new column in this paper than Trump’s visit to Buffalo Monday night?  So there I was, in the press pen, literally walled off from the event with no food, no booze, no nothing.  What a glamorous life the media lead.  Most of the press sat stoically at their laptops, hammering away and rarely even looking up at the speakers.  I had intended to schmooze some of them and get some inside scoops but I wasn’t feeling the warmth.  






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Truckin’ up to Buffalo






Food Truck Tuesdays just kicked off their fourth season on Tuesday, April 19, 2016. When you see the enormous gathering of people at Larkin appreciating the food, conversation, beer and live music it’s easy to question the widespread belief that people have lost the ability to socialize because they are living instead on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. It’s more the case those media helped get them together to enjoy some actual real world socializing. 






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In The Spotlight With Michele Ragusa






Artvoice caught up with Michele Ragusa shortly after she completed a triumphant run as the title character in Hello Dolly! at Riverside Theatre in Vero Beach, Florida. From Broadway, to Florida, to Kleinhans, the Western New York native and Niagara University graduate works all the time. 






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George Woodman Photographs






O

ne of the works in the current Nina Freudenheim Gallery show of photographs by George Woodman is called Hymn to Classicism.  It consists of collage-effect vertical strips of various Greek or Roman classical or classical revival sculptures, and one–one vertical strip–salon academic classicism painting.  

But most of the works in the show could be called hymns to Classicism, which they reference in various ways.  Often by incorporating images of classical sculpture–often signature classical manner nude figural sculpture–or classical architectural elements, a Corinthian order capital, other architectural fragments.  Sometimes by including a nude–or partially nude–model in conjunction with the nude sculptural figures.  Or sometimes just the nude or partially nude same model.  Or sometimes the model in street dress.  Or sometimes another model appearing only in street dress, but often in photos or collage with the sometimes nude or partially nude model.  

All as classical reference, the play with the nudity idea.  One of the classical statues that shows up in a couple of the works is the modesty Venus, nude but as if caught by surprise in that state, gesturing to hide her nudity, top and bottom.  

These are large-format photographs of mixed primary and secondary photos–the immediate photo, the photo of the moment, incorporating other photos–layered and juxtaposed so that sometimes it’s hard to tell what imagery is primary and what is secondary.  

And very Italian.  The number and variety of classical statues is evocative of an Italian art gallery, plus the titles of several works that include sculptural images specify actual Italian galleries, such as the Museo Nazionale del Bargello and the Galleria Romanelli, both in Florence.      

One of the Woodman photos is called Shrine for a Saint.  It features a carpentered sort of desk organizer or wall rack with several receptacle boxes and several prints of the same portrait photo of a woman who could be any Italian woman from the second half of the nineteenth century or first half of the twentieth, and another photo of another woman, turned slightly oblique–the photo not the woman–from the plane of the primary photo, so obscured in that way.  And not clear what the relation–if any–to the woman in the multiple photos. 

Another photo called La Principessa Cowboy Florentina is of the sometimes nude or partially nude model, nude in this case except for a near-miss version of a cowboy hat, straight out of a spaghetti western.    

The only explicitly non-Italian-reference work is called Girl in Kimono.  Actually two kimonos, or almost.  Putting on a black kimono over a white one.  Or maybe taking off the black one.  All a bit puzzling.  She’s also missing her head–or rather, we’re missing her head–which is cut off at the top of the picture.  

Woodman is an artist in various media, first and foremost painting, then photography.  In addition, he has a major work on permanent display in Buffalo–in the Delavan-Canisius subway station–in the medium of painted tiles.  Inspired by Moorish medieval tile work in the Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain.

In an artist’s statement, Woodman talks about his usual work process and usual work.  “Most days for the past sixty years,” he says, “I have gone into my studio and made the art that I long for.  This has been a painter’s practice…Today I make photographs in much the same way…Pictures come into mind, are reflected upon, often changed, surrendered to and eventually realized…These photographs push themselves into my world.  I am usually happy to see them, but sometimes saddened or perplexed.  Photography is like painting, but completely different…”  

The George Woodman exhibit continues until May 11. 






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Bisons Open 29th Season Downtown






28 years ago to the day, Buffalo unveiled its new downtown ballpark, then named Pilot Field, to rave reviews not only locally, but across the nation and the baseball world. Buffalo was high on the list for Major League Baseball expansion, the new stadium set the bar for design and amenities seen nowhere in the minor leagues, and the city celebrated with a parade, and all the pomp and ceremony befitting such an event.






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Hamister May Need More Taxpayer Money to Revive Failed Project






According to informed sources in the Buffalo development community, Mark Hamister is about $6 million short of the mark in financing for his much-hyped $35.7 million Niagara Falls hotel project on Rainbow Blvd. that was trumpeted by state and local officials more than three years ago as the city’s best hope to revive downtown.






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