"He does all my thinking for me" - Emiliano 'Little Head' Salinas.
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Emiliano Salinas: The Stoned Way of Wisdom

Just two days before Vanguard’s brithday, Emiliano Salinas wrote this touching essay – replete with not so thinly veiled illusions to the man who did the thinking for him – his master, his true father, Keith Alan Raniere.
Read the essay in Spanish:

THE STONED WAY OF WISDOM

By Emiliano Salinas

Many years ago I read a text about what we think of our parents. It went something like this:

At age 5: ” Dad is a genius .”

At age 15: ” There are many things that dad does not understand .”

At 20 years old: ” Dad does not understand anything, he is already choking .”

At age 50: ” What a pity that dad died. I begin to understand some things he said to me . “

At age 60: ” The old man was a genius, what a shame I did not realize before .”

The message of the text I liked a lot as a child and I still like it, although now years later and as a dad I see it with different eyes evidently. For any teenager, they are all idiots. That is a natural arrogance, fruit of inexperience, that we have all known. But this arrogance does not end with adolescence. When the Mexican team plays, everyone, from our chair, we are technical directors and we are sure that we would do much better than who is technical director of the national team. Likewise, with that same arrogance, we judge people who are in positions of responsibility that we have never had, and who face decisions that we have never faced, and it seems very simple. Everything looks very easy until you try it.

It requires the experience of the years, the errors, the consequences, and with them the inevitable baths of humility, to really assess the capabilities, our own and those of others, and develop a more objective perspective of ourselves.

Thus, in the best of cases, throughout life-of all life-that arrogance is being displaced by wisdom. But inevitably it is required to make mistakes, to realize the error, and to have the inner strength to rectify our perspective. And from there repeat the same exercise tens, hundreds, maybe thousands of times. The most terrible consequence of arrogance is that it prevents us from learning from our mistakes, because according to us we are not capable of committing them, and then it condemns us to commit them again and again without end. Our arrogance is what determines whether throughout life we ​​become wise, or permanent fools who just think they know everything.

***

I know much of what Emiliano said above sounds like word salad. But if you’ll pardon my arrogance, I think with the addition of a few bracketed comments, I can improve the clarity of Emiliano’s sentiments.

 

Many years ago I read a text about what we think of our parents. It went something like this:

At [mental] age 5: ” [my real] Dad [Vanguard] is a genius .”

At [mental] age 15: ” There are many things that [my biological] dad does not understand, [but Vanguard knows all].”

At 20 years old: “Dad does not understand anything, he is already choking.” [But it doesn’t matter, I follow Vanguard]

At age 50: ” What a pity that dad died [and Vanguard went to prison]. I begin to understand some things he said to me.”

At age 60: ” The old man was a [diabolical] genius, what a shame I did not realize before [that I can be just as evil as my papa and almost as evil as Vanguard.]”

The message of the text I liked a lot as a child and I still like it, [because I am still mentally a child]although now years later and as a [cuckold and a] dad [at least I think I’m a dad – and considering I am gay it is not a bad accomplishment] I see it with different eyes evidently [I see it from my little one-eyed monster.] For any teenager, they are all idiots [and I remain one to this day]. That is [for me] a natural arrogance, fruit of inexperience [although I am opposed to calling gay men ‘fruits’ – it’s derogatory], that we have all known [and which I especially possess]. But this arrogance does not end with adolescence [no, Sir, I am hanging on to it forever]. When the Mexican [ESP] team plays [with people’s lives], everyone, from our [High Rank] chair,  we are technical directors and we are sure that we would do much better than who is technical director of the [ESP]  national [Mexican] team. Likewise, with that same arrogance, we judge people who are in positions of responsibility that we have never had and who face decisions [that will change the world and brand its women – a concept, as men] that we have never faced, and it seems very simple [just trick, coerce, then brand them]. Everything looks very easy until you try it [but let me assure you, branding hurts like hell].

It requires the experience of the years, the errors, [like botching the ‘K’ in the brand] the consequences, [such as being arrested] and with them the inevitable baths of humility [in the hot tub, when Vanguard couldn’t get it up], to really assess the capabilities [of how stupid women can be], our own [innate dishonesty] and those of others [who lie and swindle], and develop a more objective perspective of ourselves [which is that we were born to follow Vanguard, no matter how insane the directions he gives our lives and destroy other’s lives as far as humanly possible].

Thus, in the best of cases, [which is one where I am not indicted and put in prison] throughout life- of all life-that arrogance is being displaced by wisdom [or vice versa]. But inevitably it is required to make mistakes, [like smuggling cash over the border with women who are likely to testify against me] to realize the error, [of not filing false criminal complaints in Mexico against them sooner] and to have the inner strength [to use my father’s assassins] to rectify our perspective. And from there repeat the same [branding] exercise tens, hundreds, maybe thousands of times. The most terrible consequence of arrogance [other than life in prison] is that it prevents us from learning from our mistakes, [yes, we should never have kept the collateral on our computers] because according to us we are not capable of committing them [from the government’s possession], and then it condemns us to [prison where we cannot] commit them again and again without end. Our arrogance [combined with our criminal propensities] is what determines whether throughout [our criminal career we escape getting indicted and get] life [in prison, because the US Feds say “] we ​​become wise [to your financial and sex trafficking crimes”], or permanent fools who just think they know everything [like the DOJ does, but believe me, if they knew everything, they would haul my ass into prison tomorrow.]

 

‘Hey, that’s me dancing for Vanguard”- Emiliano Salinas

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Artvoice

Artvoice

News and art, national and local. Began as alternative weekly in 1990 in Buffalo, NY. Publishing content online since 1996.

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