Amy Greenan, Tidal Wave, Acrylic and ink on Yupo paper, 2011.
Arts & Culture

“DREAM LAND” AT BUFFALO ARTS STUDIO, FEBRUARY FOURTH FRIDAY

Buffalo Arts Studio is pleased to announce a new Community Space Exhibition, Dream Land. Featuring the artwork of Amy Greenan, Melanie Fisher, and Travis Keller, this exhibition will explore identity, collective memory, and the speculative-surreal tied to each of the artists’ engagements to the landscape genre. Dream Land will be on view from February 22 – March 16, 2019, with an opening reception as part of M&T Fourth Friday, February 22, 2019, from 5-8pm.

Dream Land is one in a series of nomadic exhibitions curated by Dreamland Arts, Inc. in an effort to reconstitute the organization’s visual arts branch. This comes in the wake of Dreamland being forced to leave its first home at 387 Franklin Street in the heart of Buffalo. Dreamland’s long-term goal is to raise enough money to purchase a property within the city of Buffalo and renew their commitment to Buffalo as a coalition of artists, activists, curators, and volunteers dedicated to Dreamland’s mission of providing a cultural alternative for artists and patrons of the Arts in the Greater Buffalo area.

Amy Greenan lives and works in Niagara Falls, NY, but one day expects to permanently land in the California desert or northern Arizona, where she has seen some of the most amazing landscapes ever. Inspired by a cross-country road trip last year and a new job at an environmental services company, she’s going back to school for environmental studies with the hopes of being an activist scientist of some kind.

Melanie Fisher’s sculptures are organic and otherworldly. With influences from nature and sci-fi, she builds large forms that are new hybrids of species, with mixed characteristics from the plant and animal kingdom. By working in a range of scales and mediums, Melanie explores the connections between our micro and macro worlds, imagining the opportunity to discover something previously unknown.

Travis Keller’s paintings are tied to the memory of his home city of Las Vegas, and those memories of living in a city led to an interest in Dystopian literature and cinema. His works often stir memories while depicting scenes that do not exist. Excessively stacked living environments visualize the fragility of social and class structures. While the presence of light is the only indication of the landscape’s vast population, the unseen residents only clear path out of their situation is through a seemingly impossible climb.


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Artvoice

Artvoice

News and art, national and local. Began as alternative weekly in 1990 in Buffalo, NY. Publishing content online since 1996.

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